Cheap hotel in Copenhagen

I’m in the market for a cheap hotel for Christina in January, and figured I’d share my list of options, in case it might be of use to someone else, or in case you my dear reader know of a place I don’t.



In order of ascending price, what I’ve found are:



  • Hotel Sct. Thomas. DKK 495 for a single, or as low as 395 if you can do shared toilet (oddly, it looks like bath is private).




  • Danhostel. DKK 520600 per person. It’s supposed to be a designer hostel. Oooh, fancy!






Looks like Sct. Thomas is the best offer out there.



Does anyone know of any cheaper options? Perhaps some of the ones around the central station where competition might be stiffer.



What’s the best way to get a better price than the advertised rate?

5 comments

Morten Frederiksen

It's funny how living in a specific city leaves you with almost zero knowledge of hotel options. Every time someone asks me for help with this, I end up referring them to someone else - or Google...
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Mark Aufflick

I can't say I ever paid anything - it turns out that staying with your friend's parents in Hillerod is the cheapest of all! Here in Australia I've had good experience with the last-minute style of hotel booking website, like wotif.com and quickbeds.com. Not sure if that dynamic translates to other countries (or if Christina is happy waiting until only 28 days out!)
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If you don't already know it, check out <a href="http://www.priceline.com" target="_blank">Priceline</a>. The concept lets you bid indirectly on hotel rooms - provided you decide on two overall parameters, rating and area. You don't get to choose the exact hotel. Priceline then submits your offer and you get assigned to the first hotel that will accept your offer. Beware, it's a one-way street - your offer is validated instantly and cannot be undone. If no place accepts the offer, you get to adjust either the bid or the rating/area. I used this for several bookings in the States last summer. For maximum effect, you need to combine PL with the community site <a href="http://www.biddingfortravel.com" target="_blank">Bidding For Travel</a> There you can get an idea of the lowest acceptable price range for any area and hotel rating, based on users reporting in their accepted offers. Sometimes late bookings can be a good thing because the hotels don't lower the Priceline rates until they are "desperate" to get rid of surplus rooms. Now, this is an American concept but it also covers some of the larger cities in Europe. Copenhagen is covered - but here's the trick: At one point Copenhagen only had 1 4-start hotel in the Priceline system, the Mariott. At that time, if you chose 4-star you were certain to get this hotel which made it easy to compare the rates. It seems that more 4-stars have been added, but back then users reported getting up to 50% discounts on the Mariott...and that's a lot of money when talking Danish hotels. I really recommend PL - it's very easy to use...and I didn't have problems in the US when presenting the receipts (some users mention being scoffed at). Saved me a tonne of money.
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Alexander Kjerulf

A friend of mine recommended Circuit Q: http://www.circuitq.dk/ He says "Definitely don't judge it by it's website. It is an excellent place, warm company, very helpful host..."
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Mark Aufflick

By the way - just found the best travel guides ever, for the design lover anyway: http://www.phaidon.com/travel/ From the Wallpaper* people. Includes tips like which room to book at the Radisson SAS to experience the original Arne Jacobsen design.
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