Software Engineer.
Serial Entrepreneur.
Spiritual Teacher.




—“I've tried it all so you don't have to!” 






Hi! I'm Calvin Correli!

I'm a serial entrepreneur, spiritual teacher, author, and the founder and CEO of Simplero. Ten years ago I would have never thought that my life could be so awesome.

For most of my life, I was pretty fucked up. I didn't want to be fucked up anymore, so I changed it.

My relationships were codependent and dysfunctional. My body ached, I never worked out, was chubby and bloated, drank too much, and I had this constant undercurrent of low-grade anxiety.

I've spent the last 17 years learning, growing, healing, and discovering who I truly am, so that I'm now living every day aligned with my life's purpose.

I'm here to help you do the same.

Read my story.

Calvin-204

Recent Blog Posts

My audio setup

I documented my video setup the other day. Time to do the same for my audio setup.

For microphone, I use a Shure SM7B on a cheap fixed On Stage desk mount stand.

I find that shock mount and pop filter is not necessary with this setup. The microphone comes insulated enough.

I run this to an Apollo Twin audio interface.

The Apollo lets you run software emulations of great hardware processors natively on the device, with super low latency. Here's my audio chain:

Let's break it down.

I run...

Read more…

Find Your Own Path

Tony Robbins is famous for saying "success leaves clues".

Modeling others is incredibly powerful.

But there comes a point where you have to realize that no one has the answers to the big questions in life.

Our parents don't.

Our politicians don't.

Our media don't.

Our teachers don't.

All they have are partial answers.

Answers that worked for them.

(Or so they think.)

No-one's been exactly where we are right now before.

No-one else has ever lived your life.

We have to find our own answers.

We...

Read more…

No Drama

Lots of people love playing the victim.

"I can't."

"It's too hard."

"It's not my fault."

"If only..."

What's worse, though, are people playing the hero.

"I know, it's hard."

"Poor you."

"Here, let me do it for you."

The hero gets to feel good about themselves because they're helping the poor victim.

They get to forget their own pain for a minute, while they caretake someone else.

But there's a cost to this.

The victim stays a victim.

Instead of saying something empowering

like "I know it's...

Read more…

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